#CollegeMedia weekly chats on Twitter to continue

CMA members team to help facilitate continuation of Reimold initiative on Sunday evenings

Twitter

The #CollegeMedia Twitter chats started by Dan Reimold are expected to continue Sundays at 7 p.m. EST.

The weekly #CollegeMedia chats on Twitter that Dan Reimold started to highlight the myriad positives in college media are continuing, thanks to the work of Brett Fera, interim director for Arizona Student Media/The Daily Wildcat, and Candace Baltz, director of Oregon State’s Orange Media Network.

Baltz was the “real catalyst” to continuing the popular chats, according to Fera.

“This is without a doubt ‘by committee.’ Candace and I have each hosted one of the two #CollegeMedia chats since Dan’s passing, and I can pretty much guarantee that it won’t be just the two of us moving forward. There is a core group who have been regular contributors in recent weeks,” Fera said.

Said Baltz: “These weekly Twitter chats are one very small part of what Dan did for our industry. His real talent was in building individuals up by calling attention to the interesting decisions being made behind the scenes in student newsrooms everywhere, and the good work being done by advisers and student journalists on any given college campus. He leaves an enormous hole in College Media.”

Fera stressed that neither he nor Baltz was “in any way trying to take Dan’s place.”

“That’s just not possible,” he said.

The online chats, Fera noted, are great resources for advisers, but would be “nothing without the student input and experiences.”

It’s expected the #CollegeMedia Twitter chat will continue to held at 7 p.m. EST on Sunday. Archives of the twitter chats will be housed temporarily at https://storify.com/brettfera,

Colleagues offer tributes to an ambassador for college media — Dan Reimold

DanAtElon2

For Dan Reimold, fostering a college media “revolution” was a a favorite and frequent topic. He preached this gospel coast to coast. Shown above, he addressed students and faculty at Elon University last year. The noted scholar, frequent contributor to College Media Review, and founder of of the influential website College Media Matters, died in August at age 34. (Photo by Colin Donohue)

34-year-old scholar provided an internationally recognized voice as an advocate on behalf of college media

As colleges and universities start their new academic years and college media begin new production schedules, College Media Review salutes the late Dan Reimold by recapping some conversations with those who knew him, as well as summarizing a few of the myriad online toasts to the College Media Association member, widely recognized as a gifted educator and expert on college media.

Dan Reimold

Dan Reimold

Reimold died August 21. The 34-year-old was an assistant professor of journalism at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia and adviser to The Hawk student newspaper.

Reimold was a frequent contributor to College Media Review during its days as a print publication through conversion to a digital first format and thereafter.

“Dan was smart, edgy, engaging and a helluva reporter in his own right. We corresponded and talked frequently over several years that I edited College Media Review, and I always knew if Dan was contributing a story package to the magazine, it would be well anchored,” said Robert Bohler, Texas Christian University, past editor of CMR.

Cover story by Dan Reimold; cover art by Ryan Honeyman

“His first piece for CMR was the Carnal Knowledge cover story in 2007 that depicted how sex columnists had aroused interest and rancor — depending on whether or not you were a student or an administrator— on college campuses. Dan was a doctoral student at Ohio U. at the time.”

Reimold contributed numerous story packages for CMR, including annual reviews of college media and the magazine’s first podcast. (See partial list at the end of this story).

“He was always a reporter who knew how to promote, and his talent revealed itself in his CMR articles.  He always met deadline, always pushed sidebars and visuals. The book on journalistic sexual revolution he fashioned from his research, and his expansion into the general blogging on crises in college journalism.  Wow, what a talent, and what a loss to our profession and to the students from all walks whom he mentored,” Bohler wrote in a message to the CMA discussion group. Continue reading

CMR Extra — Quick Links

CMR Editor’s selection for newsmaker links…

Transitions — The Media World takes note of the life and contributions of prolific contributor to CMR, Dan Reimold, 1981-2015.

Continue reading

Dan Reimold — Scholar, CMR contributor dead at 34

Reimold was a leader in college media education, advocacy

Dan Reimold, an internationally recognized leader in the field of college media and frequent contributor to College Media Review, died this week, according to a release issued today on the College Media Association discussion group.

Reimold

Dan Reimold, college media advocate and scholar

What Jim Romenesko did for professional media, Dan Reimold did for college media through his popular blog College Media Matters. He covered the students who were covering their campuses, and he consistently legitimized an often-overlooked area of journalism. When collegiate media was facing budget cuts, publication thefts and other threats, he shed light on their struggles.

The Romensko site reports an official cause of death hasn’t been released and a friend tweeted early Friday morning that it was “an accident.” Reimold was 34. Additional information in the developing story is also available at the Neiman Lab web site. Continue reading

For photojournalists, internships are a must

Baltimore Sun photo intern Al Drago dances after making an early deadline at the Baltimore Ravens vs. San Francisco 49ers preseason NFL game in Baltimore, M.D. in August 2014. Photo by Rachel Woolf.

Al Drago dances after making an early deadline at the Baltimore Ravens vs. San Francisco 49ers preseason NFL game in Baltimore, M.D. in August 2014. Photo by Rachel Woolf.

‘Eyes of History’ winner shares views on developing skills as photojournalist

By Bradley Wilson, Ph.D.
Midwestern State University

Al Drago

Al Drago

The White House News Photographers Association honored Elon University senior Al Drago this month as part of its 2015 “Eyes of History” student still photography contest.

The journalism major from Durham, N.C., was selected following a public judging, hosted at the National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C. The contest’s judges were Matt McClain, a staff photographer with The Washington Post; Allison Shelley, an independent documentary photographer and multimedia journalist; and Brendan Smialowski, a photojournalist based in Washington, D.C.

The chief photographer for “Elon Local News” and former photo editor for The Pendulum, Drago has gained several accolades in recent years. The National Press Photographers Association, Society of Professional Journalists, and North Carolina Press Photographer Association have all recognized his work. Continue reading

Handing out papers builds overall awareness of the product

— and motivates rack pickups

By David Simpson
Director of Student Media
Georgia Southern University


If you want a college student to read a newspaper, hand it to her.
That may not sound profound, but it’s the most important lesson I’ve learned about circulation at two colleges where I’ve worked.

DavidSimpson

David Simpson of Georgia Southern University enjoying the New York tabloid experience while attending the National College Media Convention. Photo by Sabastian Wee.

At Georgia Southern University, we were printing 3,500 copies of The George-Anne newspaper on Tuesdays and 4,500 on Thursdays (for an enrollment of about 20,000) in January 2014. On some days, a large chunk of those papers remained on racks until they were recycled.

In spring 2015, we printed 5,500 copies on both Tuesday and Thursdays.Returns on a bad day were around 10 percent. The difference was the Street Team.

Eight students on a modest stipend worked two-hour shifts just standing at a busy spot and saying, “Hi, have a newspaper.” Every Tuesday and Thursday, they put 2,800 papers directly into the hands of students. (OK, every now and then there was a problem, but when we were fully staffed and doing it correctly, all those papers were handed out.) Continue reading

CMR’s Research Annual available for download

College Media focus of research activities

College Media Review’s Research Annual is now available for download from this site.

2015ResearchAnnualCover

CLICK IMAGE to download

Volume 52 for CMR contains peer-reviewed research relating to college media and its practitioners that was published by the College Media Review (CMReview.org) during the 2014-2015 Academic Year.

To download a copy of this volume, CLICK HERE.

For previous editions of the Research Annual, see the “Archive” link at the top of the home page.

 

Research (Vol. 52) Do college students want to see political news in their newspaper?

Campus Readership Habits

Jeffrey B. Hedrick, Ph.D.
Jacksonville State University


The future of print newspapers is a topic for discussion due to declining circulation numbers over time, as online news consumption rose sharply in recent years, coupled with the costs and technological challenges of the rapid advance of the mobile era (Sasseen, Olmstead, & Mitchell, 2013). Some publishers have decreased their fulltime staff, while larger papers have eliminated bureaus in hot news zones. Several daily newspapers with high circulation numbers in one Southern state (Alabama) have in fact reduced their publication frequency, eliminating at least one day and as many as four days. The Anniston Star no longer prints a Monday edition, while the Huntsville Times and Birmingham News have eliminated their Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday print editions. Those who work with students in college media are challenged by survey findings that indicate the job market for 2013 communication graduates seeking employment has “stalled,” unfavorable findings recruitment-wise for programs in general (Becker, Vlad, & Simpson, 2014, 1).

Jeffrey Hedrick

Jeffrey Hedrick

University newspapers have also been affected by economic conditions and socio-cultural changes as well (Craven, 2013). Educational revenue is unpredictable and undependable, particularly in southern states like Alabama that practice “proration,” the process of making mid-year budget cuts (Public Education in Alabama After Desegregation). States are spending about 28 percent less on higher education than they did in 2008, with Alabama spending 39.8 percent less per student (6th highest cut) over the past six fiscal years: FY08 to FY13 (Oliff, Johnson, & Leachman, 2013). These conditions are prompting student media advisers nation-wide to explore ways to make ends meet and maintain circulation numbers. Continue reading

German student offers tips on being College Photographer of the Year

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Mario Wezel

By Bradley Wilson, Ph.D.
Midwestern State University

Since 1945, the College Photographer of the Year competition has been the premier competition for college photographers. Last spring, CPOY, administered at the University of Missouri, announced the winners selected from 11,024 still images, 82 portfolios, 456 picture stories and 169 multimedia stories and projects entered by 545 student photographers from 99 colleges and universities in 18 countries.

CPOY named Mario Wezel of the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Hannover, Germany, as the 69th College Photographer of the Year. Wezel’s work was awarded Gold in the portfolio category, as well as awards of excellence in Documentary and in Interpretive Project. Continue reading

Teaching journalism beyond our newsrooms

On educating non-journalism students, colleagues, and administrators about 1A, the role of the campus press and media advisers

By Lindsey Wotanis, Ph.D.
Marywood University

Cheryl Reed, former adviser of The North Wind, the student newspaper at North Michigan University, is the latest casualty in war between College Administrations and the First Amendment. Just a few months earlier, it was Jim Compton, former adviser of The Calumet at Muscatine Community College in Iowa.

TheWoodWord_Wotanis

In five years of advising Marywood University’s student newspaper, The Wood Word, I’d never once received a phone call asking me to “rethink” something until…

At a time when colleges and universities around the country are facing enrollment crises, student newspapers that publish less-than-favorable stories about their campuses are seen by administrators as ‘problems’ that need handling. So are their advisers, who are often also faculty members. Sadly, the solutions to the problems are usually censorship or termination of the media advisers.

Reports have suggested that at Northern Michigan, Reed and the student in line for the editor-in-chief position were fired after the student newspaper published reports critical of the administration and of the university’s finances. Reed has since filed suit against the newspaper’s board of directors. The suit names five students and Steve Neiheisel, the university’s vice president for enrollment management and student services, whom Reed claims influenced the students to terminate her.

“Colleges and universities need to foster an open environment where student media outlets are free from interference, even from publication boards,” said College Media Association (CMA) President Rachele Kanigel in an email to members about the case. “There are many ways to bully student media and removing an adviser is simply that: bullying.” Continue reading