Undergrads to compete for new research award

‘Research in Action’ at CMA’s New York Conference

The College Media Association will host its first annual undergraduate research panel at the CMA Spring Convention in New York this year. “Research in Action” will feature students from three universities who will present their works and compete for CMA’s first Apple Award in Undergraduate Research.

Cheyenne Mathews, from University of Alaska Anchorage, will present “Media Literacy Education in Alaskan Schools: A Content Analysis of Alaskan School Districts’ Curriculum.” This content analysis examines media literacy instruction and the role of journalism offerings in the largest Alaskan school districts.

Brandon Liemer, from Florida Atlantic University, will speak on “The Podcast Era: Emerging New Media to Enhance Academia.” His study explores the use of podcasts as a new, emerging and contemporary form of media. He employs survey research to examine student interest in podcasting and the possibility of including it in communication curricula.

Valerie Miller and Henry Tasker are from Virginia Wesleyan University. They will co-present “Digital Deception: Examining Source Credibility and Native Advertising in Online News Editorials.” This experiment assesses college students’ ability to identify native advertising and corresponding media literacy and source credibility levels.

The session, at 10 a.m. Thursday, March 7, in Marquis B of the New York Marriott Marquis, will include Kelly Messinger from Capital University as the panel moderator. Elizabeth Smith from Pepperdine University will serve as the discussant.

Research (Vol. 56) Plagiarism in College Media

Is plagiarism a problem? Is there a solution?

By Carolyn Schurr Levin
with the research assistance of Paola Guzman

Introduction

The article raised red flags immediately. The topic was studying tips for final exams. The student writers on the staff love pitching this type of “list” assignment. The stories do not entail a lot of investigative reporting and are relatively easy to write. The school newspaper [1] publishes them routinely. But, this one didn’t sound right to the faculty adviser, when she read it as part of her weekly newspaper laboratory course [2]. The story included sentences like, “Leave yourself ample time.” The adviser’s students simply did not use the word “ample.” So, she plugged the story into a free online plagiarism checker, something that she does not routinely do when she reads stories written by the students in her class. Within minutes, she found the blog post that the story was copied from, essentially verbatim.

The adviser emailed the student, a senior broadcasting major poised to graduate from college in a mere few weeks, and asked her to stop by the adviser’s office before class the following morning. The student inquired in her email response about the purpose of the meeting. The adviser told her that she had some concerns about the story submitted that week.

The adviser and the student met the next morning in the adviser’s office. The adviser showed the student her story, side-by-side with the blog from which it had been copied, with the identical paragraphs highlighted in yellow. The student looked at both, wide eyed, and said unflinchingly, “We can’t do that?”[3]

Continue reading “Research (Vol. 56) Plagiarism in College Media”

College Student-Run News Entities and Communications Agencies

Finding Solidarity in the Era of ‘Blame the Media’

By Doug Swanson
California State University, Fullerton

Being a journalism or broadcast educator was never an easy job. These days, under the shadow of ‘fake news’ and amidst the widely-promoted claim that journalists are ‘enemies of the people,’ the work can seem immensely more difficult. The rewards can seem more elusive.

College media advisers are educators who teach students to become responsible citizens in a noisy world in which a multitude of media so persuasively point in the opposite direction. Regardless of the specific media entity advisers work with, there are common opportunities and challenges. College student-produced publications and broadcast operations have much in common with the quickly expanding population of student-run communications agencies. There’s much we can learn from each other. We must work together to strengthen our educational presence and show clearly our public value in these tumultuous times. Continue reading “College Student-Run News Entities and Communications Agencies”

Research (Vol. 56): The Best Medium for the Story

A Case Study of Integrated Student Media

By Patrick Howe and Brady Teufel

Abstract

This study explores the quantifiable and cultural changes that occurred at one large college student media outlet during the five years after it combined several distinct media to form a fully “integrated” newsroom. The study draws on participant observation, in-depth interviews, examinations of web and social media analytics and written analysis performed by student leaders to identify key objectives and outcomes. It explores obstacles, both cultural and technological, that arose, and it identifies opportunities for other college media to serve audiences using a similar approach.

Continue reading “Research (Vol. 56): The Best Medium for the Story”

Undergrad research panel to be launched at NY conference

Papers Accepted until Feb. 1

The College Media Association is accepting submissions by undergraduate students of original, non-published traditional and nontraditional research in the form of either abstracts or research papers on current media issues. Papers will undergo a blind review process, and top research will be presented at the 2019 College Media Association convention in New York March 6-9.

Submission deadline is Feb. 1. The eligible period is for work between July 1, 2017 to Dec. 31, 2018.

Abstracts should be between 250 and 500 words. Full papers should be no longer than 25 pages, excluding references, tables and appendices. If accepted, full papers are due by Feb. 18. Papers may have multiple student authors and only be student work.

Papers are welcome on any topic that addresses current media issues. Nontraditional research, such as films, enterprise projects, web content, and performance works are acceptable but must have an abstract. Submissions from all theoretical and methodological perspectives are invited. Continue reading “Undergrad research panel to be launched at NY conference”

Videolicious: It does one thing…

videolicious class
My classic selfie in Louisville with the 9 a.m. Videolicious class.

… but Videolicious does it really well

By Bradley Wilson
CMR Managing Editor

My session on Videolicious was at 9 a.m. on Friday, on a cold and drizzly day in Louisville. I expected about five people to show up. After all, Videolicious has been around for a while. Either you’ve heard of it and are using it. Or you haven’t heard of it and don’t care.

When I got to the room, there were already five people. Perfect.

Then five more. And five more. And, before you know it, there are about 25 people there. So much for a hands-on demonstration. But we tried. And we played.

I believe it when the folks at Videolicious say, “Video is the most popular content in the world.” And it’s growing. Continue reading “Videolicious: It does one thing…”

Diversity in college media — action plan and resources

Developing a Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan

By Rachele Kanigel

San Francisco State University

Keyshawn Housey (left) and Peter Egede (right) lead a march on Georgia Southern University’s campus on Oct. 19, 2018 to protest the university’s response to a student’s use of the N-word in a text correspondence with her assigned roommates. (Special to CMR) Click here for related story.

Want to improve your coverage of underrepresented communities and the issues that impact them?

Here’s an action plan and important resources to help you get your student media staff ready.

Continue reading “Diversity in college media — action plan and resources”

Increased incidents and hate crimes pose challenges for student journalists

Up Next:  An action plan and resources on how to improve diversity opportunities in campus newsrooms. Coming next Tuesday in CMR.

Covering Bigotry on Campus

By Rachele Kanigel

San Francisco State University

Matthew Enfinger, editor-in-chief of The George-Anne at Georgia Southern University, reads the newspaper’s special issue exploring the campus community’s responses to the N-word. (Special to CMR)

Last summer, before they even met, two roommates at Georgia Southern University introduced themselves and started chatting over text. It all seemed friendly until one young woman, who is White*, inadvertently wrote this to her soon-to-be roommate, who is Black:

Her insta looks pretty normal not too nig—ish.

The message was intended for a third roommate who was assigned to share the room with them. Mortified, the woman who sent the text immediately apologized.

“OMG I am so sorry! Holy crap,” she wrote. “I did NOT mean to say that. … I meant to say triggerish meaning like you seemed really cool nothing that triggered a red flag. I’m so embarrassed I apologize.”

But the apology didn’t stop the text conversation from going viral. Before long screenshots of the exchange were all over social media.

Matthew Enfinger, editor-in-chief of The George-Anne, the student newspaper at Georgia Southern University, recognized the incident as a news story, but also as an opportunity to delve into the deeper issues it represented.

Continue reading “Increased incidents and hate crimes pose challenges for student journalists”

The art of branding and marketing college media

Shorthorn marketing team: two members of the marketing team, Javeria Arshad and Matt Weseman handing out copies of The Shorthorn on campus. (Photo: Adam Drew)

There’s an art to many aspects of marketing

By Debra Chandler Landis

Students at Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, didn’t seem as engaged—or interested—in The Pulse, a student-run media hub comprised  of a website, magazine, yearbook and radio station as the student journalists wanted to see.

Pulse branding literally can fly through the air.

Copies of the magazine, published three times a semester, remained on racks. The website, regularly updated with new content, wasn’t generating the anticipated conversations. Response to freebies with The Pulse logo was lackluster.

Something needed to change, Pulse staffers said, and adviser Ed Arke encouraged them to see what they could do.

The students embarked on a rebranding and marketing campaign in spring 2018 that found them designing a new logo, overhauling The Pulse website, and creating new Pulse posters and brochures that were in place when fall 2018 classes started.

The work is paying off. Continue reading “The art of branding and marketing college media”

Sympathy for the Devil (Almost)

The latest journalism scandal evokes memories of the man in the street

By Michael Ray Taylor
Henderson State University

On Nov. 8, after a lengthy investigation, the Houston Chronicle retracted eight articles written by political reporter Mike Ward. Many of the people quoted in these articles appear to have been invented. Ward, who joined the paper in 2014 after a long stint at the Austin American-Statesman, resigned in the wake of the accusations after they surfaced in September.

While a far cry from the journalistic norm President Trump would have us believe, fake quotes from fake people have become all too familiar. From the famous cases of Janet Cooke, Jason Blair and Stephen Glass to more recent transgressions discovered at The Intercept and CNN, some “journalists” have in fact chosen to invent people rather than interview them.

As a journalist for over 30 years, I deplore any act reducing press credibility at a time when journalists face daily attacks from the President. As a journalism professor, I worry about the ever-decreasing number of students willing to consider our maligned career. How, I wonder, can I promote ethical behavior in an age of shock radio and Russian trolls, especially when even prominent professionals take heinous shortcuts? Continue reading “Sympathy for the Devil (Almost)”